Agile Tour London 2016

Welcome on the new website of the Agile Tour London. This 4th edition of the Agile Tour London will happen Friday 21st October 2016 in Etc.venue Victoria near Pimlico Tube Station.

We are very proud to have a Keynote by Antony Marcano.

Like usual the Agile Tour London is packed with some amazing Talks and Workshops, The program is composed of 25 talks and workshop. If you wonder how it was in the previous edition you can check our video of last year with InfoQ or have a look at our gallery.

The Early Bird Tickets are available on Eventbrite.

Follow us on Twitter @agiletourlondon

Register Now
55 days
19 hours
3 minutes
18 seconds

Speakers

Talks

Don’t put me in a box

Antony Marcano

09:00 - 09:45

Keynote 45 min

The impact of job-titles on agility
Outside of work we can have many labels. A single label can mean we are responsible for many diverse things. For example, as a parent we are also life-coaches, counsellors, tutors, entertainers, friends, chauffeurs, driving instructors, investors, cleaners, cooks, sports-coaches, law-enforcers and more.
Yet, as soon as we get to work we are put into much smaller boxes, labelled in a way that creates artificial boundaries around how we contribute to our teams. Is this because the depth of skill required to do our jobs makes it impossible to be anything other than this one thing? Or, could it be more for another reason? Could this reason be a fundamental impediment to the agility of our teams?

-

Fragile Agile: coaching a tired team

Anna Obukhova

10:15 - 11:00

Talk 45 min

Virtually all Agile coaching techniques assume that people and teams are in normal physical and mental conditions. And even in such cases introducing the change is difficult and people tend to be resistant to change innovations. And what happens if the team you plan to coach or manage is tired, exhausted or even burned­out? Yes, this might happen because of an ineffective process and you expect that your suggestions will help, but in this state people are not able to hear and follow new ideas. General Agile coaching and facilitation techniques will not work on the tired team or even make things worse. There is a need develop a special set of actions, tailored to work with exhausted people. This includes approaches to project management and people motivation, choosing facilitation techniques that accommodate the level of team overwork. In this talk I will describe what changes when the team is tired, how to estimate the stage of exhaustion. We will discuss what needs to be modified in the coaching and facilitation techniques and in the Agile process that you as a coach or a scrum master can help your worn out team to transition into a better process and produce steady results.

-

Kanban Metrics in practice

Mattia Battiston

10:15 - 11:00

Talk 45 min

Why should I bother collecting metrics? How can they help me? My CFD is pretty and colourful, but what is it actually trying to tell me? CFD, control chart, lead time distribution, percentiles...Metrics can be daunting to start with but if you know how to interpret them they can help you drive continuous improvement and forecast the future, taking your Kanban system to the next level! It’s much easier than you think, no need for complex maths or expensive software. At Sky Network Services a few teams are using Kanban and metrics. In this talk I’ll share our experience: what metrics we use, how we use each one of them, what pitfalls we encountered and what little data we collect to get a whole lot of value.

-

Your Company Will Never Be Agile

David Tanzer

10:15 - 11:00

Talk 45 min

Your company wants to become agile. Most companies want that. So they hire some consultants, do a couple of re-orgs, call their line managers Scrum Masters, and so on. And then they declare success: Development is a little bit cheaper now. But many of those companies with "successful" agile transitions did not really become agile. They don't have real business agility or sustainable development or truly self-organized teams. The ugly truth is: If your company is not already agile, it most likely will not become agile. Not within a reasonable period of time. In this session, I will talk about some reasons why so many companies fail to become really agile, and why young, small companies often "get it". And we will discuss what you can do to overcome those problems.

-

Death by User Stories

Jenny Martin

10:15 - 11:00

Talk 45 min 

As an overwhelmed cross­functional team member In order to deliver business value as early as possible I need 6589 disembodied user stories sitting in a backlog in Jira Like I need a hole in the head. It’s approaching 20 years now since iterative development teams started using user stories to capture customer needs, however many teams are still struggling to achieve the benefits of these practices. The whole point of iterative delivery was to help us to deliver in smaller chunks, so that we could get our ideas to market more quickly and either start getting value from them, or refine our approach. User stories are supposed to help us with this by focusing on value, and by helping us track small vertical slices of work around that value. As we embark on our discovery activities however, we find it’s not that easy. We start ‘user story splitting’. What we thought was a small user story grows and grows until we can no longer fit it in our delivery iteration. We’re overwhelmed with potential implementation details and we don’t know which ones are important. Since our user stories are going to be thrown away, we’re not sure where to capture important details about how our system will behave. We lose sight of the bigger picture. Our backlogs get larger and larger and we stop believing in them. We are in user story hell. Have we wandered away from the original intended use of user stories? After putting all that effort into creating and tracking user stories, what useful artifacts are we left with to help us support and maintain our systems? Do we actually create more work for ourselves by adhering to one prescribed format for exploring customer needs? We only get value out of iterative delivery practices if we are always working on the most important thing. We need to be able to defer detailed examination of stuff that isn’t important until later. To contain our discovery activities and avoid death by user stories we need more convergent practices to help keep us focus us in the right direction. In this talk I’d like to introduce the OOPSI model for agile analysis. OOPSI stands for Outcome, Output, Process, Scenarios, Inputs. It’s based on Chris Matt’s feature injection and is a useful model to help add more convergent thinking to our software delivery practices. The OOPSI technique helps us structure our discovery activities so that we are always working on the right thing and can see the bigger picture. It gives us a narrative and context for our analysis artefacts and the examples, tests, and scenarios that support them. OOPSI is an outside­in process. We start with the outcomes (the value), and expertly navigate the quickest path to achieving those outcomes. We might even be able to do this without writing a single user story (But shhhhhhhh! don't tell anyone I said that!)

-

Listen With Your Eyes - Non-Verbal Communication for Agile Teams

Helen Lisowski

11:15 - 12:00

Talk 45 min

As agile practitioners - whether you are a developer, tester, scrum master or product owner, we know that it is ALL about communication, right? But how much of what we say and what we hear is words? If, as much as 93% of our communication is non-verbal how can be sure we are 'saying' or 'hearing' the right thing? Non-Verbal Communication is sometimes referred to as Body Language, although it does include more than that. This session is designed to give you a gentle introduction to this field, help you recognise some common behaviours, and show you how to start using this every day. We will look at some basic indicators the may mean the person you are looking is feeling uncomfortable, is feeling shut-down in the conversation, or that might help you understand how confident the person speaking is about what they are saying. It will not give you a tick list of behaviours that indicate lying or cheating! These skills are a starting point for a journey that could keep you engaged for the rest of your life, and enrich your interactions with people both at work and at home. If part of your role includes communication with human beings, you need to know this stuff. What is exciting, is just how much you probably already know....

-

Time to Clean up the Product!

Monika Turska

11:15 - 12:00

Talk 45 min

This is a story of a product team who dared to challenge the habits of an organisation in order to optimise the long-term value of a product portfolio for their customers. The story begins when a product leader confronts with the reality of a slightly oversized portfolio of applications. While many of these applications and their features are still of a high demand, there are some which value seems to be less clear. The customers start questioning the quality of products. The team is chasing after the expectations and, what feels to be, a never-ending queue of bugs and support issues. Less and less time is available for a development of new features and products, while the ideas and requirements keep coming from a number of sources. An innovative spirit of the team is in danger. A major change is needed. It's the time to take the whole organisation and customers on a journey to empower the inevitable decisions. The lessons learned from withdrawing digital pro ducts and features from a market.

-

Never Develop Alone : always with a partner

Fakih Houssam

11:15 - 12:00

Talk 45 min

In February 2016, I celebrated my 4th anniversary developing using full-time pair-programming. By full-time I mean that when I arrive in the morning at work I do not have my own computer. I share a computer all the day with another developer of my team. At first sight, it might look easy, amazing and a kind of luxury. Instead of having one person to develop a new functionality we have two persons that work together on it. In reality, it is a tiring but exciting work: ‘Tiring’ because you need to have more skills than solo developers. ‘Exciting’ because it challenges you and if it does not challenge you it does not change you. In this talk, I’ll focus on the challenges and the main benefits of this kind of pair-programming for you, for your team and for your company: How you can make the most of this kind of programming? How each pair can boost his partner? How you can improve your technique of pairing? How you can anticipate problems and fix them? What are the common errors about pairing?

-

Agile application development for cloud-native apps

Michael Hausenblas

11:15 - 12:00

With the advent of containers and serverless offerings the move from on-prem to the public cloud has been accelerating in the past two years. In this talk we will discuss best practices, real-world case studies as well as challenges around the development, deployment and operation of cloud-native applications.

-

Toyota Kata puzzle experience

Håkan Forss

13:15 - 15:00

Talk 90 min

"We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.” - Aristotle You have been doing agile for a few years now. With a regular cadence you have retrospectives and a lot of problems and great improvement opportunities are raised but you don't seem to really improve. Let us put your retrospectives on steroids. Start using Toyota Kata! Building on the power of habits, Toyota Kata will help you build a daily continuous learning and improvement culture, a kaizen culture. In this intense and interactive 90 min session, you will be introduced to the two main Kata* of the Toyota Kata, the Improvement Kata and Coaching Kata. We will experience the fundamental behavior patterns at the core of the Toyota Kata methodology: the rapid experimental cycles and the Coaching Dialog. You will gain direct insight into the power of the Improvement Kata and Coaching Kata through repeated personal practice. You will experience how these daily habits or routines will help you to strive towards a state of awesomeness in small experiments focused on learning. Small teams will work together striving to achieve ever higher levels of awesomeness using the Improvement Kata and Coaching Kata, thereby gaining practical hands-on familiarity with Toyota Kata. Learning outcomes: · Provide an introduction to the core routines, mindset, and behavioral practices of Improvement Kata and Coaching Kata. · Allow you to experience the core routines of the of the Improvement Kata and Coaching Kata through interactive, hands-on exercises Who should attend? The target audience are Lean/Agile Coaches, Scrum Masters, managers and anyone interested in continuous learning and improvement methods. Anyone can attend. Prerequisites No prior knowledge needed. If you want to prepare the following two books are highly recommended: Toyota Kata: Managing People for Improvement, Adaptiveness and Superior Results by Mike Rother and Lean Enterprise: How High Performance Organizations Innovate at Scale by Jez Humble, Joanne Molesky, Barry O'Reilly Time to stop collecting problems and start forming new habits of learning and improving! (*) Kata means pattern, routine, habits or way of doing things. Kata is about creating a fast “muscle memory” of how to take action instantaneously in a situation without having to go through a slower logical procedure. A Kata is something that you practice over and over striving for perfection. If the Kata itself is relative static, the content of the Kata, as we execute it is modified based on the situation and context in real-time as it happens. A Kata as different from a routine in that it contains a continuous self-renewal process.

-

Scrum vs ScrumAnd vs ScrumBut: which one are you doing?

Pedro Gustavo Torres

13:15 - 14:00

Talk 45 min

The 2015 State of Scrum Report tells us that Scrum is currently the most adopted Agile practice. In-spite of the massive popularity of this framework we see that organizations rarely use vanilla Scrum… using instead ScrumAnd or even ScrumBut. I intend to explore these two concepts and help the audience understand which Scrum they are currently doing. In this talk I will also compare modifications and add-ons and I’ll also explain the Shu Ha Ri learning model and how I map it to ScrumBut and ScrumAnd.

-

Teal organisations: The next paradigm shift in recognising and handling complexity

Dean Latchana

13:15 - 14:00

Talk 45 min

Frustration and disillusionment are prevalent states in many organisations. These challenges are founded in organisations adopting cultures, hierarchies and ways of working that are inappropriate to the complexities inherent to their environment. We are on the cusp of the next paradigm shift, where some organisations are finding fundamentally different ways emancipating their teams to overcome such intractable challenges. They are adopting a new operating system that allows teams to search and exploit new business opportunities. These are Teal organisations, and they represent the next modus operandi for teams and organisations, who possess the qualities of self-management, wholeness, purpose and business agility. Join this talk if you'd like to learn how such Teal organisations succeed, and how you and your team can gain the best chance to succeed by adopting their approach.

-

Growth Hacking for Product Managers

Andrea Darabos

13:15 - 14:00

Talk 45 min

Growth Hacking is a hot topic now in digital companies - many companies like Skyscanner, Linkedin, Booking.com, Buffer hiring VP or Growth roles and setting up their Growth teams. In this talk we will bring a summary of these trends and explain what it means for agile product managers and their teams. We will cover the following topics: What comes Before Growth: The Golden Retention for product-market fit How to understand your Growth Model What is the Growth Roadmap, how can it help you grow your product? How to prioritise Growth Initiatives? Who should be on your Growth team and how together with your agile stakeholders?

-

The Cost of Queues - Informed Decision Making Using Cost of Delay

Andy Hiles James Enock

14:15 - 15:00

Workshop 45 min

Don Reinertsen says that if you only quantify one thing, quantify the Cost of Delay. By quantifying the Cost of Delay we are providing ourselves with a common currency for improving how we prioritise and schedule our work. We are also providing ourselves with a tool for understanding the economic damage done by the queues in our development process. In the first part of the workshop we will introduce you to Cost of Delay using a simple economic framework which will allow you to surface assumptions about value. We will then look at various urgency profiles to understand how the value of the work will decay over time, which in turn will enable you to make transparent prioritisation decisions. In the second part of the workshop we will look at how queues are damaging your organisation and how Cost of Delay can help you put a price on those queues, and guide decisions on how to improve flow.

-

Remote working in an agile world

Raji Bhamidipati

14:15 - 15:00

Talk 45 min 

My experience of being a remote tester in an agile team Main statement: What does it mean to you/your colleagues/your company if you are a remote worker? How is it different to being an ‘office worker’? Let’s find out! Abstract Picture this! – I landed a job with a company and team that I had wanted for a long time. Everything was going to plan until after about a year when I faced relocating to a far off land due to personal reasons. Imagine having to give up a job that you love and believe is going to be good for your career progression. Imagine working for a company that’s so awesome that, when I told them I had to move, they offered me the chance to become a full time remote worker! This was about 2 years ago and I have been a full time remote worker since then. I have learnt a lot during this time and want to share my experiences with you. Geographical limitations no longer stop people from working on awesome teams, or stop companies recruiting the right testers for the job. There are huge benefits for the remote worker and the company alike. However, there are also drawbacks on both sides and remote working is not something to take lightly. To make remote working work there have to be changes made by the remote worker, the company and the colleagues who work in the office. I want to present what these changes could be and could potentially mean to you, and your team. Key points we will cover during the session:

  1. Interacting with immediate team and wider team
  2. Keeping the communication channel open, but avoiding noise
  3. Emotional impact of remoting and how to overcome this
  4. Setting up home working environment
  5. Changes to be made by ‘Office workers’

-

Punishment Driven Development

Louise Elliott

14:15 - 15:00

Talk 45 min

What is the first thing we do when a major issue occurs in a live  system? Sort it out of course. Then we start the hunt for the person to blame so that they can suffer the appropriate punishment. What do we do if a person is being awkward in the team and won’t agree to our ways of doing things? Ostracise them of course, and see how long it is until they hand in their notice – problem solved. This highly interactive talk delves into why humans have this tendency to blame and punish. It looks at real examples of punishment within the software world and the results which were achieved. These stories not only cover managers punishing team members but also punishment within teams and self­punishment. We are all guilty of some of the behaviours discussed. This is aimed at everyone involved in software development. After the talk attendees will understand:

  1. Why we tend to blame and punish others.
  2. The impact of self­blame.
  3. The unintended (but predictable) results from punishment.
  4. The alternatives to punishment, which get real results.

-

The most important things I have learnt this year

Simon Powers

15:30 - 16:15

Talk 45 min

Being in the unique position as founder of Adventures with Agile, I have attended some of the best training classes in the world as a learner, facilitator, and helper. Plus as head of consultancy I have the privilege of being able to visit lots of clients and be engaged at different levels of multi-national organisations - all in the realm of large scale organisational change and enterprise coaching. I have collated the most useful things I have learnt this year, with examples of where they can be or have been used. These learning points will give others a toolkit to tackle similar problems in their own organisations or their clients. Insights come from the likes of Craig Larman, Sharon Bowman, Lyssa Adkins, Don Reinertsen, Scott Ambler, David Anderson, Dan North, Alistair Cockburn and many others as well as members of the Agile community and our clients.

-

Lies, damned lies and estimates

Maurizio Pedriale

15:30 - 16:15

Talk 45 min

They drive decisions, translates into deadlines and cause headaches... and yet, despite decades of experience in the industry and a bunch of techniques in our toolbelts, estimating work remains one of the most painful process. In this talk I'll explore the facts and fallacies of agile estimation, from "How to estimate" to "Why estimate at all"...

-

The Agile organisation

David Leach Kam Zaman

15:30 - 16:15

Talk 45 min

Organisational agility is really tough to achieve but its benefits are immense. At Reed Online we are going through a period of rapid growth. We want an office that people love to work in, a place where they could be creative, have greater autonomy and a sense of purpose. Through high engagement, low turnover and aligning our values with agile and applying agile and lean principles and practices our business continues to see growth in a competitive marketplace. Having found alot of synergy with Spotify, Atlassian, Thoughtworks and having success in our software development teams we embarked on exploring how we could achieve organisational agility. Agile and in particular Scrum have been popular for a while now but how does an organisation gain the benefits of agility. How does Agile and its values and principles really have context outside of software? For the last 2 years we have been on a journey, a journey that is far from over, but is worth sharing on how Agile and in particular Lean is helping to make Reed Online a better place to work, finding creative ways to solve customer problems, producing more innovative products and more satisfied customers. This talk will look at how we structured our teams, how we are moving away from vanity metrics, how we utilise finance and marketing in our development teams. How our people team (HR) not only use Kanban to help prioritise work and to give visibility on progress but also how we apply group based interviews to ascertain an individual's fit in a team, a collaborative, autonomous, real life problem solving, self organising scenario. Actually spending several hours with the teams you are applying to work with.

-

Why too much choice is killing your company

Edward Scotcher

16:30 - 17:15

Talk 45 min

It’s one thing to have a great idea, but quite another to do something with it. Organisations, teams and individuals often struggle to do something good with the idea they have had, but why? Is it bad organisational leadership, poor product owners, underperforming engineering teams or something else? Turning ideas in to reality requires emotional maturity and clarity of thought. To take advantage of the true benefits of Agile, Lean and Systems thinking when delivering product, we first need to look at the science of the choices we make and how to avoid the politics and power games that get in the way of ideas realisation.

-

Putting the 'V' back in MVP

Ralf Jeffery

16:30 - 17:15

Talk 45 min 

Lean Startup principles advocate a approach of building the simplest version of the product or service that you can and get in front of your target market group as fast as possible. Watch them use it. Listen to their feedback. Then improve or change. Most organisations when confronted with this approach understand the logic and benefits of an MVP. Why then, do so many struggle to execute successfully? This talk discusses the principles of MVPs and the diverse ways in which they can be executed, illustrating with case studies. It discusses the common barriers encountered within organisations when creating an MVP, and highlights how they can be overcome from the perspective of each key stakeholder group. Finally, drawing upon personal experience of working on agile projects within financial services, ecommerce and telecoms organisations, both large and small, explore the factors necessary for excellent MVP execution. Learning outcomes:

  1. Understand the different types of MVP execution
  2. Hear real life examples of MVP successes and failures
  3. Understand the mind­set of key stakeholder groups, why they struggle to support MVPs and how these barriers can be overcome
  4. Learn how successful teams practice MVP design and execution.

 

-

The making of a lean agile coach

Carlo Beschi Luca Minudel

16:30 - 17:15

Talk 45 min

Let’s explore and discover good answers to the following questions: What outcomes does a Lean­-Agile Coach produce and how to measure success? What competences must a Lean­-Agile Coach have? What are good personality traits for a Lean­-Agile coach?
We will also look at a very distinctive characteristic at the heart of the lean-agile coaching role that makes it different from a consultant, an evangelist, a salesman, and a director/lead, and we will look at the career of a coach.

-

Practical Value Stream Mapping for Flow Optimisation

Joe Schmetzer

10:15 - 12:00

Workshop 90 min

Value stream mapping is a well known lean management technique. It can be used to visualize the current state of value generation activities (including software development), and thus provide a tool that can be used to analyse, reflect and improve the process. How do you actually create a value stream map in the first place? This workshop will show you how. We first introduce some theoretical background material about value streams, and then dive into to a practical exercise in capturing a value stream map (using pens and sticky notes), and then analyzing the results.

-

How motivated is your team? Going beyond the traditional performance management

Jose Casal

13:15 - 14:00

Workshop 45 min

This practical workshop will introduce a number of techniques that we can use to help us understand and improve the levels of engagement and motivation in our teams as well as explore what factors (positive and negative) are impacting us. These techniques can be used as modern & richer alternatives to traditional performance management approach. They come from a number of backgrounds including Management 3.0, Innovation Games and others.

In this workshop, the attendees will be able to explore techniques such as:
- Happiness Index
- Kudos Cards
- Moving Motivators
- Gallup Q12 on Staff Engagement
- Waste Snake
- Staff Liquidity

-

Let's get Agile and MOVE!

Ryan Behrman

14:15 - 15:00

Workshop 45 min

In this workshop we will demonstrate the use of space, somatic (felt) experience, and movement, for harnessing individual and team intelligences. The practices can be used for standups, planning and estimating, delegating, one-to-ones, retrospectives, demos, and even in remote working. Movement and somatic awareness contribute to creativity, productivity, health, and wellbeing in the workplace. Be prepared for some surprising insights!

-

Lean Startup game

Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse

15:30 - 17:15

Foto 7-04-16 21 54 23 Foto 27-05-16 14 58 38 Foto 27-05-16 13 50 25Workshop 90 min

We will play a board game that teaches you the principles of Lean Startup! You will need to conduct experiments, build your product, invest in your company and sell your product. Do you get product-market fit? Who will conquer the mass market first? If you are new to Lean Startup, join and play the game to learn. If you know about Lean Startup, join and practice your skills and share experiences. This session will be highly interactive and fast-paced. You need to decide (with your teammates) upon your strategy and adapt that strategy while gaining insight. No prerequisite knowledge required. About Lean Startup: Reduce waste. Make better, faster decisions. Build products people want. The Lean Startup provides a scientific approach to creating and managing startups and get a desired product or service to customers' hands faster. The Lean Startup approach has been coined by Eric Ries and builds upon Customer Development (by Steve Blank). Lean Startup has inspired others to apply the methodology to the whole enterprise, User eXperience, analytics, branding, etc. "The Lean Startup isn't just about how to create a more successful entrepreneurial business. It's about what we can learn from those businesses to improve virtually everything we do. It's ultimately an answer to the question: How can we learn more quickly what works, and discard what doesn't?" –Tim O'Reilly, CEO, O'Reilly Media
The session can be played with maximum 12 participants (4 teams of 3 people).

-

Program

Room 1 Room 2 Room 3 Room 4 Workshop
08:15 Registration and Breakfast
09:00 Don't put me in a box – KeynoteAntony Marcano
10:00 Break
10:15 Fragile Agile: Coaching a tired teamAnna Obukhova Kanban Metrices in PracticeMattia Battiston   Death by User StoriesJenny Martin Your Company Will Never Be AgileDavid Tanzer Practical Value Stream Mapping for Flow Optimisation part 1Joe Schemetzer
11:00 Break
11:15 Listen With Your Eyes – Non-Verbal Communication for Agile TeamsHelene Lisowski   Never Develop Alone : always with a partnerFakih Houssam  Agile application development for cloud-native appsMichael Hausenblas Time to Clean up the Product!Monika Turska Practical Value Stream Mapping for Flow Optimisation part 2Joe Schemetzer
12:00 Lunch Break
13:15 Scrum vs ScrumAnd vs ScrumBut: which one are you doing?Pedro Gustavo Torres   Teal organisations: The next paradigm shift in recognising and handling complexityDean Latchana   Growth Hacking for Product ManagersAndrea Darabos  Toyota Kata Puzzle Experience part 1Hakan Forss   How motivated is your team? Going beyond the traditional performance managementJose Casal
14:00 Break
14:15 Punishment Driven DevelopmentLouise Elliott Remote working in an agile worldRaji Bhamidipati  Toyota Kata Puzzle Experience part 2Hakan Forss The Cost of Queues – Informed Decision Making Using Cost of Delay (workshop)Andy Hiles James Enock Let's get Agile and Move!Ryan Behrman
15:00 Tea Break
15:30 The most important things I have learnt this yearSimon Powers  damned lies and estimatesMaurizio Pedriale The Agile organisationDavid Leach Kam Zaman   Sponsor Demo Lean Startup game part 1Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse
16:15 Break
16:30 Putting the ‘V’ back in MVPRalf Jeffery Why too much choice is killing your companyEdward Scotcher The making of a Lean Agile CoachLuca Minudel Carlo Beschi   Sponsor Demo Lean Startup game part 2Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse
17:15 Farwell drink

Register

Powered by Eventbrite

Venue

Etc. Venue Victoria, Etc. Venue Victoria 1 Drummond Gate London, SW1V 2QQ

https://www.etcvenues.co.uk/venues/victoria   |   +44 020 3011 0990

Crew

David Gimelle

Leader / Founder

Oliver Szymanski

Speaker Manager / Founder

Andrea Darabos

Program Committee

Simon Powers

Program Committee

Tony Bruce

Program Committee

Hina Paracha

Community Manager

Cyril Lapinte

Web Manager

Randeep Singh

Partnership Manager

Sponsors